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Columbia 5 ☆ very popular Blood Chicago Mall and Guts Short Shirt Superlight Sleeve

Columbia Blood and Guts Superlight Short Sleeve Shirt

$35

Columbia Blood and Guts Superlight Short Sleeve Shirt

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Product description

Ideal for warm weather fishing, it’s designed with UV-protective fabric and a flip-up collar that secures under the chin to keep the sun off your neck. Other functional details include a fully vented mesh-lined back for enhanced airflow, rod holder, and roomy hook and loop closed fly box pockets at the chest. Radial sleeves enhance mobility for big casting action. Relaxed fit.

You want to catch a fish, not smell like one. That's where this stain-resistant short-sleeve shirt comes in. The Blood 'N Guts superlight shirt is made of an ultralight polyester fabric that's specially designed to repeal stains and dry fast. This helps you clean your catch while staying spotless. The shirt is also ideal for warm weather fishing, with UV-protective fabric and a flip-up collar that secures under the chin to keep the sun off your neck. Other functional details include a fully vented mesh-lined back for enhanced airflow, a rod holder, radial sleeves that won't restrict your movement while casting, and two roomy hook-and-loop closed fly box pockets at the chest.

About Columbia's Garment Technologies"br" This garment is outfitted with Columbia's Omni-Shade and Omni-Shield Blood 'N Guts technologies. Blood 'N Guts is a fabric treatment that's specially designed to resist and wash out liquid stains. The treatment provides two lines of defense. Initial liquid stains bead up and roll off Blood 'N Guts-treated fabric. However, in some cases pressure may cause some liquid stains to penetrate treated fabric. For stains that penetrate the first line of defense, the Blood 'N Guts formula also works to release stains with agitation and soap in the washing machine. The protective benefits of Blood 'N Guts technology may diminish over time due to dirt and wear, but these benefits are easily restored simply by washing and drying your garment between uses. Proper care of your Blood 'N Guts-treated product will help it perform the best when you need it the most.

Columbia's Omni-Shade clothing protects you from damaging UV radiation by blocking the majority of the sun's harmful rays, letting you stay out longer on sunny days. Unlike SPF (Sun Protection Factor)--which is a measure of sunburn reduction from sunblock and protects you from UVA rays--Columbia's Omni-Shade products are far more versatile, combining a tight-weave construction, UV reflectors, and UV absorbing technology. These features not only prevent sunburns and long-term skin damage, but they also protect the wearer from UVB rays in addition to UVA rays. UVB rays are much more harmful than UVA, and are present even on cloudy days. Plus, Omni-Shade doesn't wear off. Instead, your safety increases as the Ultraviolet Protection Factor (UPF) increases. Several layers of Omni-Shade protection are available: UPF 15, UPF 30, UPF 40, and UPF 50-plus. It's like sunscreen, but you don't have to reapply. All Omni-Shade fabric carries the Skin Cancer Foundation's Seal of Recommendation, which is given to sun-protective fabrics that have a minimum UPF of 30.

Features:

  • Construction: 100-percent superlight Blood 'N Guts polyester
  • "li"Omni-Shade sun protection: UPF 50 "li"Flip-up sun protection collar "li"Rod holder "li"Quick dry "li"Vented "li"Imported
"p" "b"About Columbia Sportswear"br" Founded in 1938, Columbia Sportswear Company has grown from a small family-owned hat distributor to one of the world's largest outerwear brands and the leading seller of skiwear in the United States. Columbia's extensive product line includes a wide variety of outerwear, sportswear, rugged footwear and accessories. Columbia specializes in developing innovative products that are functional yet stylish and offer great value. Eighty-year-old matriarch Gert Boyle, Chairman of the Board, and her son, Tim Boyle, President and CEO, lead the company.

Columbia's history starts with Gert's parents, Paul and Marie Lamfrom, when they fled Germany in 1937. They bought a small hat distributorship in Portland, Oregon, and named it Columbia Hat Company, after the river bordering the city. Soon frustrated by poor deliveries from suppliers, the Lamfroms decided to start manufacturing products themselves. In 1948, Gert married college sweetheart Neal Boyle, who joined the family business and later took the helm of the growing company. When Neal suddenly died of a heart attack in 1970, Gert enlisted help from Tim, then a college senior. After that it wasn't long before business really started to take off. Columbia was one of the first companies to make jackets from waterproof/breathable fabric. They introduced the breakthrough technology called the Columbia Interchange System, in which a shell and liner combine for multiple wearing options. In the early 1980s, then 60 year-old Gert began her role as "Mother Boyle" in Columbia's successful and popular advertising campaign.

The company went public in 1998 and moved into a new era as a world leader in the active outdoor apparel industry. Today, Columbia Sportswear employs more than 1,800 people around the world and distributes and sells products in more than 50 countries and to more than 12,000 retailers internationally.

Columbia Blood and Guts Superlight Short Sleeve Shirt

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22 September 2021

Arctic sea ice has likely reached its minimum extent for the year, at 4.72 million square kilometers (1.82 million square miles) on September 16, 2021, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. The 2021 minimum is the twelfth lowest in the nearly 43-year satellite record. The last 15 years are the lowest 15 sea ice extents in the satellite record. 

14 September 2021

Each September, the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder informs the public of the annual Arctic sea ice minimum extent, an indicator of how climate change is affecting the Arctic, the fastest-warming region of the globe.

Scientists at Northern Arizona University, Arizona State University, the Arizona Geological Survey at the University of Arizona, and the National Snow and Ice Data Center at the University of Colorado Boulder have been awarded almost $2 million from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to develop a virtual reality teaching tool called Polar Explorer.

The National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) announced this week their participation in the 50x30 Coalition, a group of governments and cryosphere and emissions research institutions endorsing the need to reduce greenhouse gas emissions 50 percent by 2030. The Coalition’s founding members endorse the scientific consensus that failure to reach this milestone will result in temperature “overshoot,” in which emissions remain too high to hold Earth within 1.5 degrees Celsius of pre-industrial levels, leading to major and irreversible damages to the environment. Damage may be especially harmful for highly temperature-sensitive frozen components of the Earth system, with impacts ranging from sea level rise to infrastructure damage to food insecurity.

Arctic sea ice has likely reached its maximum extent for the year, at 14.77 million square kilometers (5.70 million square miles) on March 21, 2021, according to scientists at the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) at the University of Colorado Boulder. The 2021 maximum is tied with 2007 for seventh lowest in the 43-year satellite record. 

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